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COCO DE MER
Styling/Design: Luisa Loveday
Photography: Saga Sig
Hair & makeup: Bea Sweet
Model: Tsanna Latouche

(Source: allthingstsanna)

Neil deGrasse Tyson: Your Ego and the Cosmic Perspective | Big Think Mentor

Neil deGrasse Tyson: Your Ego and the Cosmic Perspective | Big Think Mentor

"…religion is just politics in the sky. If God looks like the ruling class, you know you are in trouble. And that’s what religion is for, to make the ruling class look like God.”

"…religion is just politics in the sky. If God looks like the ruling class, you know you are in trouble. And that’s what religion is for, to make the ruling class look like God.”

studioafrica:

THE WOMEN OF AFROFUTURIST SOUND by Kareem Reid (westindians)

These women are just a few examples of pioneers in contemporary art and culture that offer unique perspectives on the multi-narratives and realities of black femininity. They often re-appropriate and challenge mainstream representations of black female bodies, sexuality and desire. Emphasis is placed on the inherently fluid nature of their identities and often present themselves as aliens or androids to communicate their “otherness”, a common thematic trend among Afrofuturist artists.

Betty Davis and Grace Jones in the 70s and 80s preceded the huge commercial success of many acts of the 90s; particularly girl group TLCJanet JacksonMissy Elliott and cult favourites Aaliyah and Kelis played key roles in bringing Afrofuturist aesthetics to the forefront of popular culture.

The rise of emerging artists Janelle Monae,THEESatisfaction, Solange, Kelela and Moko are encouraging signs of a new wave of enigmatic performance artists charged with the double-objective of making us dance as well as think.

(via shadowstookshape)

The Origins and Impact of Afrofuturism

The Origins and Impact of Afrofuturism 

shadowstookshape:

THE FUTURE WEIRD: SUPRA-PLANETARY SOVEREIGNS

This November, the Future Weird returns loaded with the retro tropes of science fiction to pay tribute to space-age prophets, musicians and messiahs. We started with John Akomfrah’s The Last Angel of History, which packages historic Black sci-fi as a futuristic Pan-African venture. Eventually, it swaps techno-centric experiments for messianic characters who fight dominating narratives of science and progress for cosmic philosophies.

This time around we depart from our previous format (feature film + shorts) in order to include interviews, testimonies, and archival footage of magnetic, creative leaders who promise transcendence for their followers, and achieve intergalactic travel through prayer as well as funk.

more information: http://www.spectacletheater.com/tfw-sps/

shadowstookshape:

In honor of the upcoming, major group exhibition The Shadows Took Shape, please join The Studio Museum in Harlem for a new series of book club discussions moderated by prominent artists, scholars, and bloggers interested in science fiction and speculative literature. The first book club meeting is today at 4pm and we’ll be discussing Octavia Butler’s Kindred with nationally recognized cartoonist, designer and graphic novelist Professor John Jennings and The AfroFuturist Affair creator Rashedaah Phillips.In Octavia Butler’s Kindred, Dana, a modern black woman, is celebrating her twenty-sixth birthday with her new husband when she is snatched abruptly from her home in California and transported to the antebellum South. Rufus, the white son of a plantation owner, is drowning, and Dana has been summoned to save him. Dana is drawn back repeatedly through time to the slave quarters, and each time the stay grows longer, more arduous, and more dangerous until it is uncertain whether or not Dana’s life will end, long before it has a chance to begin. Image: Octavia Butler reading a book in 1975.

shadowstookshape:

In honor of the upcoming, major group exhibition The Shadows Took Shape, please join The Studio Museum in Harlem for a new series of book club discussions moderated by prominent artists, scholars, and bloggers interested in science fiction and speculative literature. 

The first book club meeting is today at 4pm and we’ll be discussing Octavia Butler’s Kindred with nationally recognized cartoonist, designer and graphic novelist Professor John Jennings and The AfroFuturist Affair creator Rashedaah Phillips.

In Octavia Butler’s Kindred, Dana, a modern black woman, is celebrating her twenty-sixth birthday with her new husband when she is snatched abruptly from her home in California and transported to the antebellum South. Rufus, the white son of a plantation owner, is drowning, and Dana has been summoned to save him. Dana is drawn back repeatedly through time to the slave quarters, and each time the stay grows longer, more arduous, and more dangerous until it is uncertain whether or not Dana’s life will end, long before it has a chance to begin. 

Image: Octavia Butler reading a book in 1975.

Tricia Rose

We Are Fine Ass Girls: Coming Winter 2012

(Source: vimeo.com)

The Hipster in the Mirror

Why do people get so agitated when discussing hipsterism? Pierre Bourdieu’s Distinction provides some clues.

blackcontemporaryart:

Black Radical Imagination is an upcoming show at Papillion Institute of Art in LA. Next week Feb 16th
Featuring emerging filmmakers Akosua Adoma Owusu, Adebukola Bodurin, Jacolby Satterwhite, Amir George and Anansi Knowbody. 
It was recently written about on Shadow and Act  http://blogs.indiewire.com/shadowandact/black-futurist-short-films-screening-in-l-a-next-week
 

blackcontemporaryart:

Black Radical Imagination is an upcoming show at Papillion Institute of Art in LA. Next week Feb 16th

Featuring emerging filmmakers Akosua Adoma Owusu, Adebukola Bodurin, Jacolby Satterwhite, Amir George and Anansi Knowbody. 

It was recently written about on Shadow and Act  http://blogs.indiewire.com/shadowandact/black-futurist-short-films-screening-in-l-a-next-week

 
COCO DE MER
Styling/Design: Luisa Loveday
Photography: Saga Sig
Hair & makeup: Bea Sweet
Model: Tsanna Latouche

(Source: allthingstsanna)

Neil deGrasse Tyson: Your Ego and the Cosmic Perspective | Big Think Mentor

Neil deGrasse Tyson: Your Ego and the Cosmic Perspective | Big Think Mentor

"…religion is just politics in the sky. If God looks like the ruling class, you know you are in trouble. And that’s what religion is for, to make the ruling class look like God.”

"…religion is just politics in the sky. If God looks like the ruling class, you know you are in trouble. And that’s what religion is for, to make the ruling class look like God.”

studioafrica:

THE WOMEN OF AFROFUTURIST SOUND by Kareem Reid (westindians)

These women are just a few examples of pioneers in contemporary art and culture that offer unique perspectives on the multi-narratives and realities of black femininity. They often re-appropriate and challenge mainstream representations of black female bodies, sexuality and desire. Emphasis is placed on the inherently fluid nature of their identities and often present themselves as aliens or androids to communicate their “otherness”, a common thematic trend among Afrofuturist artists.

Betty Davis and Grace Jones in the 70s and 80s preceded the huge commercial success of many acts of the 90s; particularly girl group TLCJanet JacksonMissy Elliott and cult favourites Aaliyah and Kelis played key roles in bringing Afrofuturist aesthetics to the forefront of popular culture.

The rise of emerging artists Janelle Monae,THEESatisfaction, Solange, Kelela and Moko are encouraging signs of a new wave of enigmatic performance artists charged with the double-objective of making us dance as well as think.

(via shadowstookshape)

The Origins and Impact of Afrofuturism

The Origins and Impact of Afrofuturism 

shadowstookshape:

THE FUTURE WEIRD: SUPRA-PLANETARY SOVEREIGNS

This November, the Future Weird returns loaded with the retro tropes of science fiction to pay tribute to space-age prophets, musicians and messiahs. We started with John Akomfrah’s The Last Angel of History, which packages historic Black sci-fi as a futuristic Pan-African venture. Eventually, it swaps techno-centric experiments for messianic characters who fight dominating narratives of science and progress for cosmic philosophies.

This time around we depart from our previous format (feature film + shorts) in order to include interviews, testimonies, and archival footage of magnetic, creative leaders who promise transcendence for their followers, and achieve intergalactic travel through prayer as well as funk.

more information: http://www.spectacletheater.com/tfw-sps/

shadowstookshape:

In honor of the upcoming, major group exhibition The Shadows Took Shape, please join The Studio Museum in Harlem for a new series of book club discussions moderated by prominent artists, scholars, and bloggers interested in science fiction and speculative literature. The first book club meeting is today at 4pm and we’ll be discussing Octavia Butler’s Kindred with nationally recognized cartoonist, designer and graphic novelist Professor John Jennings and The AfroFuturist Affair creator Rashedaah Phillips.In Octavia Butler’s Kindred, Dana, a modern black woman, is celebrating her twenty-sixth birthday with her new husband when she is snatched abruptly from her home in California and transported to the antebellum South. Rufus, the white son of a plantation owner, is drowning, and Dana has been summoned to save him. Dana is drawn back repeatedly through time to the slave quarters, and each time the stay grows longer, more arduous, and more dangerous until it is uncertain whether or not Dana’s life will end, long before it has a chance to begin. Image: Octavia Butler reading a book in 1975.

shadowstookshape:

In honor of the upcoming, major group exhibition The Shadows Took Shape, please join The Studio Museum in Harlem for a new series of book club discussions moderated by prominent artists, scholars, and bloggers interested in science fiction and speculative literature. 

The first book club meeting is today at 4pm and we’ll be discussing Octavia Butler’s Kindred with nationally recognized cartoonist, designer and graphic novelist Professor John Jennings and The AfroFuturist Affair creator Rashedaah Phillips.

In Octavia Butler’s Kindred, Dana, a modern black woman, is celebrating her twenty-sixth birthday with her new husband when she is snatched abruptly from her home in California and transported to the antebellum South. Rufus, the white son of a plantation owner, is drowning, and Dana has been summoned to save him. Dana is drawn back repeatedly through time to the slave quarters, and each time the stay grows longer, more arduous, and more dangerous until it is uncertain whether or not Dana’s life will end, long before it has a chance to begin. 

Image: Octavia Butler reading a book in 1975.

afrikanspaceprogram:

Officially in Eso Won Books!!!

afrikanspaceprogram:

Officially in Eso Won Books!!!

Tricia Rose

We Are Fine Ass Girls: Coming Winter 2012

(Source: vimeo.com)

The Hipster in the Mirror

Why do people get so agitated when discussing hipsterism? Pierre Bourdieu’s Distinction provides some clues.

blackcontemporaryart:

Black Radical Imagination is an upcoming show at Papillion Institute of Art in LA. Next week Feb 16th
Featuring emerging filmmakers Akosua Adoma Owusu, Adebukola Bodurin, Jacolby Satterwhite, Amir George and Anansi Knowbody. 
It was recently written about on Shadow and Act  http://blogs.indiewire.com/shadowandact/black-futurist-short-films-screening-in-l-a-next-week
 

blackcontemporaryart:

Black Radical Imagination is an upcoming show at Papillion Institute of Art in LA. Next week Feb 16th

Featuring emerging filmmakers Akosua Adoma Owusu, Adebukola Bodurin, Jacolby Satterwhite, Amir George and Anansi Knowbody. 

It was recently written about on Shadow and Act  http://blogs.indiewire.com/shadowandact/black-futurist-short-films-screening-in-l-a-next-week

 

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Supreme Radiant

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